JANUARY – Sasha Shaw – Plant Bullies

Sasha Shaw

Plant Bullies

Monday, November 15th, 2010, 6:30 – 9 pm

NHS Hall Section A, Center for Urban Horticulture, 3501 NE 41st St. Seattle, WA 98105 Map

Weeds are a nuisance for any gardener, but some invasive plants also pose a threat to the health of our forests and natural landscapes. King County noxious weed expert Sasha Shaw will go over invasive plants that are taking over local natural areas and waterways and even our own backyards.  She will explain how invasive and noxious weeds spread, where they come from, and what we can do to stop them. Come learn how to identify the most serious weeds, so you can find and control them before they take over.

OCTOBER – Mary Ellen Asmundson – Flora, Fauna, and Gardens of Australia

Mary Ellen Asmundson

Flora, Fauna, and Gardens of Australia

Monday, October 18th, 2010, 6:30 – 9 pm

NHS Hall Section A, Center for Urban Horticulture, 3501 NE 41st St. Seattle, WA 98105 Map

After 140 million years of geographic isolation, unique flora and fauna evolved on the continent of Australia, adapted to survive in a harsh climate.   Visiting Australia is like venturing into another world.  My talk is based on my third trip last year in October and November.  My  photos highlight Australia’s natural beauty, native plants, birds, and marsupials in the wild taken during my travels through the Daintree Rain Forest, botanical gardens, and the cities of Melbourne and Sydney and surrounding countryside.   I will also be featuring selected homes and gardens I visited during a two week tour I took with the Northwest Horticultural Society.

SEPTEMBER – Claire Cockroft – Primulas

Claire Cockcroft

Primulas

Monday, September 20th, 2010, 6:30 – 9 pm

Primulas in the wild and in my garden. This image shows Primula involucrata ssp. yargongensis photographed in Sichuan province in June 2007.

JULY – Summer Picnic – Fancy Fronds

HPSW 2010 SUMMER PICNIC

Saturday July 31st, 12-3 PM

Enjoy a potluck lunch, challenge yourself with a horticultural mini-quiz, see the Thai inspired Pavilion inspired by the musical, “The King and I”, splash in the river, and stroll through the greenhouses and around the grounds.

Potluck at 1 pm, followed by a brief general meeting at 2 pm- no agenda, but a chance to ask questions and share ideas.

Bring something to share for the potluck lunch – no need to sign up. If we all bring desserts, that’s what we will eat. We will provide beverages and plates, etc.

Directions:
Fancy Fronds
40830 172nd Street SE
Gold Bar, WA 98251

From I-405, go to the Hwy 522 interchange in Bothell/Woodinville. Take the exit going east toward Monroe, where it merges with Hwy 2.

Make a left onto Hwy 2; Gold Bar is 15 miles east of Monroe. (If you are driving from Hwy 2, drive straight through Monroe.) Go east towards Stevens Pass on Hwy 2.

At the east end of Gold Bar, just past the Mt. View Diner on the right side of the road is a large electronic highway sign proclaiming various messages about the hazards or conditons on Stevens Pass. Just beyond this sign is Dorman Road.

Turn right onto Dorman Road, cross the RR tracks and continue to the end of the farmer’s field where Dorman turns abruptly to the left. The second private road on the right (between two fenced fields) is marked by the intersection of 408th Ave. SE and 172nd St. SE.

Turn right on 408th Ave. SE onto a gravel road marked Private Drive. 408 turns into 172 as it turns abruptly left. Continue down the gravel road until you see the greenhouse arches on the right side of the road. Pull through the entrance gate and park along the driveway.

Here is a link to a map of our area courtesy of Google Maps. Be sure to check out the satellite feature they offer. It is amazing.  You can zoom out until you see where you are coming from.

JUNE – Jan Whitner – The Chinese Garden: Four Variations

Jan Whitner

The Chinese Garden: Four Variations

Monday, June 21st, 2010, 6:30 – 9 pm

The history and design of Chinese gardens are as rich and complex as Chinese culture itself.  This presentation showed imperial, temple, scholar, and Sichuan gardens as they appear in  Beijing, Suzhou, Chengdu and other centers of the Chinese gardening world.

Photo credit: Judy Koenig